It Doesn’t Have to Be in Focus

It Doesn't Have to Be in Focus: Water Landing

Lucky you!

If you’ve never called yourself a photographer, you’ve probably never been subjected to photographic critique. This is a process by which other photographers dissect your image, applying their own tastes, experiences and preconceptions. If you’re fortunate enough to get some wise soul with similar tastes (photography is a broad church), you might learn something useful. But, probably not. You’ll just be less impressed with yourself than before.

Follow the Leader

Photographers are (generally) experts at taking photographs. But, they’re still learning all the time. I think—and this may be a little controversial—that they may not always be the best judge of a photograph’s merits. My theory is that they often cannot see the wood for the trees. They are sometimes too close to the process to appreciate the result. Are musicians the best judge of the latest album releases? No, of course not.

Birds Running on Water

Does it matter if your image is over-exposed, cock-eyed, blurry or dark? Should you try to compose the main elements using the Rule of Thirds or Golden Rectangle as guides? Does it have to be in focus? There is no right answer. Or, if there was, I’d have to guess that the answer is: it depends. What does it depend on? Your guess is as good as mine.

Flash of White

One thought on “It Doesn’t Have to Be in Focus

  1. Tim

    If you like your own photos then you shouldn’t care what others say.
    Judges have to justify their selection so tend to pull everything else apart.
    The rules of photography really should be called guidelines. But people like rules!
    Ignore them, Keith – judges and the rules 🙂

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